?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Adventures in apathetic nation - Many a mickle maks a muckle

> Recent Entries
> Archive
> Friends
> Profile

September 9th, 2003


Previous Entry Share Next Entry
03:05 am - Adventures in apathetic nation
Unexpected amusing things do happen from time to time, but largely I'm pretty down and unproductive. (Amusing things include funny LJ posts, fruufoo's proposed local FLRP game, polite wrong number calls, spotting the hidden message in the Blackball movie poster and Channel 4's The Games.) I don't feel like going into details, but Britain seems to be accepting defeat in a battle I hoped it never would, with the consequence that a first love grows ever more distant. I hate being cryptic, but the overlap between people who I might trust with more information, people who are sufficiently well-informed to understand the references and people who might feel the same way that I do, even among you fine folk, is terribly small; here I fear (with experience from people who fell into the first two categories but, alas, not the third) that the potential downside of sharing exceeds the potential upside, so I will bottle it up for now.

Reasonably interesting trip to Teesside University on Thursday; I am looking for database courses, partly so that I might apply more successfully for database-heavy jobs. Two options: I can take a one-night-per-week course all year, at approximately 20% the workload of a full-time student, and get a "one-fifteenth of an undergraduate degree" certificate for £150. (Half-price for your first one-fifteenth; double that later.) Another option is that they offer the first half of the database course for free, but you study it at half speed and so would have to wait another year to get on the more advanced half of the course. This free option is offered at about ten venues around the county, but the nearest to me is no more convenient than the university. I probably could still get the same certificate, but it would be half in databases and half in spreadsheets. Options, options; I will probably take on one or the other. (If I take the database-heavy faster option, I may be able to tap someone else for the cost of the courses, too.)

I suspect I'm not getting as much from LiveJournal as I used to, even after fiddling around with my filters. Accordingly, I'm going to try something a little different: a book review.

TV Nation was a 17-episode show broadcast in the summers of 1994 and 1995 in the USA and the UK (then later around the world) in which Michael Moore, previously most famous for the documentary Roger & Me (and more recently most famous for the documentary Bowling For Columbine, which I still haven't seen) presented news stories in a humorous style, siding with working people against the corporations, institutions and organisations of America. (Occasionally his ambitions were more global.) The main tactics used were to point out absurdity, to suggest how effective ground-level activism could be and to perform minor acts of civil disobedience when sufficiently amusing. In 1998, the series spawned a book, co-written by Moore and the series' producer Kathleen Glynn, Adventures in a TV Nation.

The bulk of the book details 25 of the 105 segments that were recorded for the show. Given that the segments tended to be about eight minutes in length, their treatment at a couple of thousand words doesn't seem to frequently add much detail. The layout is attractive; most pages have photos or sidebars. The writing style is simple; I would expect 14-year-olds not to have trouble with reading the book, though they would miss many of the cultural references. It's a very easy read, more like a collection of short stories than anything else. The most fondly-remembered stunts were those with Crackers the Corporate Crime-Fighting Chicken, but I have a lot of time for a segment in which Moore challenges Fortune 500 CEOs to do manual jobs associated with their companies. (To be fair and balanced - remember, series two of TV Nation was broadcast on Fox! - the CEO of Ford did change the oil in one of his company's cars.)

The most interesting chapters are, inevitably considering my tastes, those which are deliberately furthest behind the scenes. The story behind the inception of the show is almost a fairy tale in the way NBC cough up a million dollars for a pilot based on the haziest of proposals. The penultimate chapter details the five segments that were never broadcast on American television; I can remember one of them clearly, a roving reporter on the trail of small condoms. (The book doesn't mention it, but the phrase that pays for the smaller penis is "snugly lined".) The book gets credit for its extensive appendices too; the show's wacky polls in full ("17% of college graduates would punch themselves really hard in the face for $50") and a very extensive guide for activists as to where they might turn should they want to follow in Mike's footsteps. It's also interesting to see one Louis Theroux credited among the acknowledgements, who has since made his name on British TV very much in the mould of the Moore protegé.

Whether you will enjoy this book or not depends to some extent on your opinion of Moore. I have fond memories of the show at the time and regard myself as a fan of his work in general. (I even thought of my previous pair of spectacles to this one as being Michael Moore spectacles - big, almost traditional-TV-screen-shaped lenses, relatively thick black frames. On reflection, with the strength of prescription I have, no wonder the thick lenses kept falling out and the frame eventually snapped.) However, despite being an easy target for this book, eight years on from the show, it all seems a little same-old, a little old-hat; I'd have preferred greater depth at the expense of breadth, for an attention span greater than that of the length of the show's segments. Of his successors, Mark Thomas takes on fewer targets but goes into more detail with them and has funnier, ruder jokes; Dave Gorman gets up to wackier antics in the name of silliness, though doesn't have any political bias.

It's a sign of failure that the book didn't particularly inspire me to take Mike's activism further, though I suspect it's 80% reader failure and only 20% inspirational failure; perhaps raising awareness is really as much of a small win as Moore is actually hoping for. Accordingly, I can recommend Adventures in a TV Nation only principally as a comic book (not a comic book but a comic     book) for light bedtime reading when you want to give yourself some subversive dreams.
Current Mood: uninspired
Current Music: My Sweet Darlin', another one of those wacky DDR tunes

(6 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments:


[User Picture]
From:ericklendl
Date:September 9th, 2003 04:13 am (UTC)
(Link)
I come bearing inspiriation. It's fairly generic, non-specific (and, I note, mis-spelled) inspiration, but it is nonetheless inspired. And indeed inspiriational.

I'm not getting a lot out of LJ at the moment either, for what it's worth. I figure that if I carry on pouring stuff in, eventually some of it will bear some fruit. Same with you, probably.

Hadn't noted the existence of a hidden message in the Blackball poster before. Steganographtastic!

I think you'll enjoy getting to grips with databases, you have the right kind of methodical, well-organised thought processes for it. Remains to be seen whether you'll want to make them a major element of your eventual job, but still a good string to have on your bow - don't forget I'm always available if you need another angle on any of the coursework. Amusingly, you'll have more formal qualifications in database usage than I've got by the end of it!
From:expetesso
Date:September 9th, 2003 05:24 am (UTC)
(Link)
I suspect I'm not getting as much from LiveJournal as I used to, even after fiddling around with my filters.

I'm sorry. Did you find anything interesting of inspiring along the way of Cle's LJ Voyager game?
[User Picture]
From:jiggery_pokery
Date:September 9th, 2003 06:23 am (UTC)
(Link)
Source material for one pleasantly silly comment, but that's really about all.
[User Picture]
From:imc
Date:September 9th, 2003 07:49 am (UTC)
(Link)
Cle's LJ Voyager game

Well, that was pointless. :-)

Random sent me to goldenosiris69, from where I went (using only users on the friends list) to. . .
chick4984
mzundrstoodgurl
boobare25
thesewalls
mr_sarcasm
alex_victory
sjc
heathrow
lisabelle
vid3ogirl
twoflower
nekoneko
tanesmuti
swamp_rat
izards
beckeyleigh
[jocelynrobin]
[uulover]
yahooeekablooee
[smurfette184]
speedkillz
geeknoir
defenestration
fraz
silhouettegirl
miss_emma_baps
[pixieassassin]
[ukkatgirl]
[purplestuart]
[sexbat]
sx23
suicideally

. . . and by complete surprise, there was beingjdc who completes the journey to me.

Users listed in brackets I could have missed out if I'd been able to see into the future. I could have cheated by going through customers_suck at one point, but I didn't.

Now, somewhere there's a thing that calculates the shortest distance between two LJ users. I wonder what that would have said.
[User Picture]
From:jiggery_pokery
Date:September 14th, 2003 07:54 am (UTC)
(Link)
It's called LiveJournal Connect and suggests you can do it in five jumps (via somebodies and zorac). You took 27 jumps minus the [bracketed] ones, accordingly you score 5/27 * 100% = 18.51%, which is one-third of a percent better than my 4/22. :-)

This is a snippy answer. I had a longer one with lots of links but Mozilla Firebird crashed for the first time and took it with it. I love MF a little bit less now.
[User Picture]
From:applez
Date:September 9th, 2003 10:56 am (UTC)

A couple of comments

(Link)
I remember TV Nation quite well, and remember Fox showing it.

It would be fairest to mention that the show only aired twice, each a different episode, with a span of about a month between the two.

Moore's stuff was just too controversial, even for Fox (then).

As for Moore's politics - he seems to be torn between activism and comedy, but is clearly a marketer of his image, and is very happy to make money from his efforts. So, taken objectively, it's difficult to quite pin Moore down, which is probably just fine by him, and most of his fans.


> Go to Top
LiveJournal.com